Polenta Fries

Let’s start with ‘hey’. Been about a month and a half since I’ve posted due to being in Asia, consequently I have zillions of lovely asian inspired recipes to follow on. However, for now I’ll post some of the recipes I’d planned to post while I was away, but due to lack of computer access, I didn’t.

We’ll start with the fact that polenta is not an asian ingredient! African if anything, I’m not 100% sure of that but they seem to like cornmeal over there, and it’s pretty similar.

Normal fries are actually vegan, so this is just a different option, offering different nutritional value and taste. Homemade fries can be healthy if baked, so it’s not necessarily a healthier option.

I hope to gradually start posting more things, but my travels aren’t over, as I move to Sweden this week, so things may still be a little slow. Feel free to check out my instagram; username @xx_lozzy_xx91. I tend to post pictures of travel and food (some of the upcoming recipes are on here already).

It is a good recipe however, for if you’re just getting to grips with how to cook with polenta. 6tag_230614-171714

Ingredients:
250ml vegetable stock
65g polenta
2 tsp mixed dried herbs (i used basil and thyme)

Method:

1. Heat the stock in a pan. When simmering, slowly pour in the polenta, and continue to stir so it doesn’t go lumpy.
2.Spread out on a tray to dry out overnight.
3. Cut into fries, and put in the oven for 20 minutes at 180 degrees.

Chow chow for now 🙂 xx

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GIANT COUS COUS BEET SALAD

Photo

 

If this post seems a little different to usual, it’s because I am not on my own computer. I am in fact, believe it or not sitting at a computer, in a youth hostel in Hong Kong! 

As obvious as it is to me I made this before I left, I realised amidst writing this, that there aren’t any major giveaways if one has never been to Hong Kong. I think the main clue would be that as far as I can tell, beetroot is not a popular ingredient over here. Also the picture is on grass as apposed to a concrete pavement (it’s a concrete jungle which is beautiful in it’s own way) but not much greenery in the area I’m staying.

As I have never intended for this to be a travel blog, I won’t blab on about my travels too much, but despite the excessive amounts of meat that’s on offer, the vegetarian dshes here are more often than not, vegan as well. Me and my friend then noticed, that in asian cooking (authentic asian cooking), there really isn’t much use of dairy. We came to the conclusion that it’s because cows are sacred in their religion (we think) as well as the majority of the substitutes that are often used in vegan cooking, originate and are grown here. I’m mainly referring to coconut and soy.

Travels aside, this was part of my vegan feast (in the previous post). It is very simple, so easy to make, and is very aesthetically pleasing. Went down a treat among my friends and family and also spraked quite a lot of conversation due to the pinkness of it. Aside from cooking the cous cous, this is much more a matter of just assembling it, and is better prepared overnight to let the cous cous cool.

 

Without further ado, the recipe;

Ingredients (serves 4 as a small main):

1 cup giant cous cous

1 cooked beetroot, diced

Large handful of watercress

1 tbsp lemon juice

1 carrot, peeled and spiralled or finely sliced

 

Method:

1. Boil some water in the kettle, and cook the cous cous on a medium heat with 2 cups of water. It should take around 15-20minutes for all the water to be absorbed.

2. Rinse the cous cous under a tap for a couple of minutes, then leave for a minimum of a few hours to cool, but preferably overnight.

3. About 5 minutes before serving, mix the cous cous with the beet, then toss it around a little to allow the beet to dye the cous cous.

4. Finally, add the carrot, watercress and drizzle the lemon juice over to serve.

MANGO, KIWI AND COCONUT CRUMBLE

In the UK we’ve been having pretty good weather as things go. Crumble is traditionally a wintery dessert in my mind, so i summered it up by adding a bit of a tropical twist. The fruit I had initially planned … Continue reading